GHREAT Projects



The impact of community led total sanitation on health perception, behavior, and environmental risks
Globally over 2 billion people lack access to basic sanitation, resulting in millions of preventable deaths every year. Decades of subsidizing sanitation infrastructure have failed to reduce this burden, illustrating the need for more comprehensive solutions. Sanitation interventions aimed at behavioral modification have shown promise, however, whether these interventions modify behaviors momentarily or influence deeper changes in health beliefs is not well understood. Dr. Bailey

Researcher:
Bailey, Morgan
Location:
Kenya
 

Tanzania
My activities during my practicum at PCI-Tanzania were focused around assessing the environmental health at 103 primary schools participating in PCI's school feeding program (funded through a USDA food for education grant) in addition to developing a set or environmental health modules for student led public health clubs at each of the 103 schools. My assessment entailed assessing the water, sanitation, hygiene, and indoor air quality at a subset of the schools. From this I developed two public health modules which were disseminated through a training of trainers framework, ultimately teaching the district health officials a series of participatory activities based on environmental health which they in turn taught to school health teachers who facilitated the health clubs

Researcher:
Bailey, Morgan
Location:
Tanzania
 

Understanding Syphilis in Peru
The study aims to epidemiologically describe syphilis in MSM in Peru and develop new diagnostic and treatment technologies. This is an ongoing longitudinal study including 400 MSM in Lima, Peru. We are working with the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, UCLA, and Epicentro in this project.

Researcher:
Brown, Brandon
Location:
Peru
 

HPV vaccine acceptability among Female Sex Workers in Peru
The study examined the acceptability of HPV vaccine among 200 FSWs in Lima, Peru. As part of a 2 year clinical trial with the vaccine offered in 2 separate schedules, participants were offered Pap smears and treatment when indicated. They were also offered HIV testing and counseling, condoms, and STI testing. We are working with NGO Via Libre on this project.

Related Links:
http://vialibre.org.pe/

Related Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tISh_81yCPA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w61X_douda8

Researcher:
Brown, Brandon
Location:
Barranco, Peru
 

The role of Genital Warts in HIV acquisition among MSM
To develop and follow a cohort of 600 HIV negative and high risk MSM in Peru. Half of participants will have genital warts (GW), and half will be GW free. The main outcome is HIV incidence, which will be compared between the two groups. We are working with the community center Epicentro and Impacta on this project.

Related Links:
http://www.epicentro.org.pe/

Related Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPJzfZZ3LSo

Researcher:
Brown, Brandon
Location:
Lima, Peru
 

Ethics of clinical trial participation in high risk groups
This project examines voluntary study participation in a clinical trial of HPV vaccine with Peruvian FSWs. We will determine what FSWs understand/perceive about participating in a clinical trial, including study specifics, risks, benefits, and voluntariness. We are partnering with Fordham University and NGO Via Libre in this project.

Researcher:
Brown, Brandon
Location:
Lima, Peru
 

Cervical screening among FSWs in Mexico
As part of a larger NIH study conducted by Investigators at UCSD, we will be collecting cervical specimens from 200 female sex workers in Tijuana and analyzing for abnormalities as part of the UC Mexus program. We are working with UCSD in this project.

Researcher:
Brown, Brandon
Location:
Mexico City
 

The Mental Health Workforce Gap in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Needs-Based Approach
Our group estimated the shortage of mental health professionals in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We used data from the World Health Organization's Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO-AIMS) from 58 LMICs, country-specific information on the burden of various mental disorders and a hypothetical core service delivery package to estimate how many psychiatrists, nurses and psychosocial care providers would be needed to provide mental health care to the total population of the countries studied. We found that all low-income countries and 59% of the middle-income countries in our sample were found to have far fewer professionals than they need to deliver a core set of mental health interventions

Researcher:
Bruckner, Tim
Location:
Geneva, Switzerland
 

Reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma through PhotoVoice: A Road to Policy Change
HIV-infected female patients of color will be recruited from the LAC+USC Maternal Child & Adolescent Center, an HIV/AIDS specialty clinic, and trained to utilize PhotoVoice. Participants will then be asked to photograph their everyday realities using digital cameras to illustrate their experiences with HIV/AIDS-related stigma. The meaning of each photograph will be recorded in a contextual journal and organized by prominent themes in preparation for discussion. PhotoVoice participants will be asked to participate in three focus groups to critically reflect on their experiences with PhotoVoice and to engage in reflective dialogue about HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Focus groups conversations will be audio-recorded and transcribed removing all potential identifiers. Conversations and discussions that took place in Spanish will be translated into English. Photographs taken as part of PhotoVoice will be utilized to create collages, art pieces, and portable galleries and exhibited in schools, medical institutions, and congregations in order to de-stigmatize HIV/AIDS via evidence based information, to change public perceptions of people living with HIV/AIDS, and to inform/inspire policy/decision makers about the struggles of stigmatized communities in hopes of informing and inspiring anti-stigma protocols, policies, and guidelines.

Researcher:
Davtyan, Mariam
Location:
Los Angeles
 

Diabetes Among Yunnan Minorities
Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality among rural Chinese people. We randomly selected 840 subjects from 7 ethnic minorities and the Han ethnic majority. We measured blood pressure (BP) and HbA1c levels. The prevalence of DM in this sample was 6.3%, with great variability between ethnic groups, ranging from 2.7% in the Tibetan group to 9.8% in the Han group (p< 0.10). HTN prevalence varied between 30.5% in the Lisu group and 54.7% in the Tibetan group (p<0.01). The prevalence of DM varied significantly across ethnic groups, where Han people had a greater DM prevalence than the ethnic minorities

Researcher:
Detrano, Robert
Location:
Yunnan Province, China
 

Jose Lemus Lopez Clinic, Mexico
I am volunteering at the Jose Lemus Lopez Clinic in rural Mexico with the UCI chapter of Flying Samaritans on a monthly basis The Jose Lemus Lopez Clinic, located in El Testerazo, Tecate, Baja California, and is a free clinic that provides health care to the people in the area who are in need. I take vital signs, record medical histories, assist health professionals, translate, and call in patients. I've been newly involved in the diabetes project that the organization implemented in which they created a self-management diabetes education program for the at-risk patients in the clinic. Volunteers working on the diabetes project, along with trained professionals, measure and check for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, total blood cholesterol levels, blood pressure, waist circumference, and BMI, among many other things. Some volunteers started a research study in which they wanted to assess how effective the education program was in reducing the diabetes mellitus patients

Researcher:
Flores, Marcel
Location:
Mexico
 

Proposal for a Qualitative Project Exploring the Migration Experiences of Iraqi Refugees in Orange County
Since the U.S. war in Iraq began in 2003 more than 64,000 Iraqis have been admitted to the United States (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012). They have arrived seeking, like refugees before them, shelter from the violence plaguing their homeland, safety and security, and promises of a better future for their families. But we know from studies done of previous refugee populations, such as Cambodians who came to the United States after the end of the war in Indochina (Marshall, Schell, Elliott, Berthold, & Chun, 2005), this image is illusory. The reality is that the migration path is fraught with tough times and many displaced persons arrive with a host of mental health and physical health problems that can persist for decades. With each new influx of refugees it is important to take a fresh look at their resettlement and integration challenges. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of research about Iraqis who have resettled in the U.S. since 2003

Researcher:
Lubens, Pauline
Location:
Iraq
 

Practicing Disaster: Organizational Preparedness for a Catastrophic Earthquake in Southern California
For this project, I am working with a graduate student to study levels of earthquake preparedness within the UCI community, with special attention to the graduate student population. Results from this research will have global implications because our graduate student population is drawn from many countries.

Researcher:
Ludwig, Lisa Grant
Location:
Irvine, California
 

Community Knowledge for Health Equity, Building Healthy Communities Grant
The CKP is a practice that explicitly addresses the systems and structures of inequality in which all humans and non humans live. The CKP is inspired by the Environmental Justice Movements around the globe where expertise itself is challenged and redefined.

Related Links:
http://httwww.communityknowledgeproject.org/

Researcher:
Montoya, Michael
Location:
California
 

Tuberculosis Mortality Decline in Thailand in the Last Half-Century
With my colleagues at Mahidol University in Salaya, Thailand, I am working on a research project to characterize the medical-demographic aspects of the decline of tuberculosis mortality in Thailand. Highlights include a comparative approach, looking at mortality decline in Thailand and the USA, and an examination of the role of HIV

Researcher:
Noymer, Andrew
Location:
Salaya, Thailand
 

Projecting Local Burden of Disease in Nigeria: Planning for Health in a Changing Global Environment
We investigated environmentally sensitive diseases in a Nigerian Burden of Disease Study. The HeaLY was employed to study the morbidity and mortality burden of selected disease conditions in Nigeria. Disease data were obtained through a network of health professionals and hospitals, and environmental data was obtained from national and international databases. Sensitivity analysis based on different discount rates ranging from +1.5% to +4.5% was included. A modeling framework for the health impact assessment of Man-Induced Atmospheric changes (the MIASMA model) was utilized to explore the trend of vector-borne disease burden. Infectious and childhood diseases accounted for the major disease burden in Nigeria during 1990-2000 and HIV was found to be another major source of disease burden. It was discovered that there is a disproportionate fraction of disease burden that is actually due to preventable environmental factors. The BOD result was found to be different from that estimated for sub-Saharan Africa in the global BOD study of 1990

Researcher:
Ogunseitan, Oladele
Location:
Nigeria
 

If you have any questions, please contact us at globalhealth.uci@gmail.com